Category Archives: library

I’m not a real librarian. I just play one at the library.

Liamalibrarianabels are so important in helping us figure out who we think other people are, right?  Pile on the stereotypes, and we’re good to go!

Children’s books about occupations sometimes fill that role, too, explaining what all kinds of people in the neighborhood do.  The Tinyville Town librarian could be me, if I had an MLIS, rode the bus, and was a different gender.  People ask me questions all the time, I help them find information, I know where those elephant books are hiding, and, dagnabbit, I like a good mystery, too.

People still think I’m a librarian, because to most people, working at the library makes you one.  Yes, I’m state-certified, but I have an advanced degree in the wrong thing, so here I am, five or so years into running the rides at Library-land, and I don’t usually call myself a librarian.  Instead, I say I work at the library.

I might not carry the cool label, but I do know a thing or two.  One thing is that books about occupations are usually kind of boring if Curious George is not involved. Tinyville Town might be a little predictable, but there’s some fun in its mildly snarky illustrations.  And this is my new favorite book for librarians, although it might be nice if a few female librarians were in it, too.  Six years ago, the American Library Association said that 83% of librarians were women. I totally get working a little diversity into the mix on gender roles, but I want to see what Tinytown’s female librarian looks like, too. Like me, maybe?  Just a thought.

I am a Librarian (Tinyville Town) by Brian Biggs

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Pigeon. Pete the Cat. Llama Llama. The election is over.

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So here we are.  It’s happened.  Pigeon has won the presidency.  Hide the keys to the Presidential bus.

Pete the Cat was just too laid back.  “It’s alllllll good,” he kept saying.  Llama Llama just couldn’t overcome the drama drama.  Pigeon, meanwhile, was racking up a number of questionable votes — why did that whole stack have EXACTLY the same X in exactly the same spot?  Why did unmarked ballots keep disappearing off the end of the counter?

Still, it’s a democracy, people.  Good luck, Pigeon, with all that messy governing you’ll have to do.  Good luck.

 

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Public libraries. Discuss.

chicken picYou might be asking yourself if this is just an excuse to post a funny chicken picture. Hmmm.  Read on, my friend, and the truth will be revealed.

Even before I began working in one as an adult, I’d had a history with libraries. Some of my earliest memories are of the Saturday mornings I spent in the children’s room at my local library, trying to quickly find ten books – my weekly limit – so that I’d be ready when Mom said it was time to head home. Later on, I worked in the high school library as an aide, putting things away, checking things in, moving books here and there, appreciating the break from multiple choice tests and pages of math problems.

In college, I passed many hours in the college library reading rooms, sometimes working at the big tables under the murals from the 1930s, sometimes collapsed in an arm chair. During my 2+ years as a full-time volunteer, I helped shepherd groups of kids to story times at the old library. Grad school meant more hours in study carrels and reading rooms, as well as hunting down references in the government documents for a professor writing a book on banking. Once in a while, I’d go to the public library there for a change. And then, when I worked with kids again, we went to programs and did summer reading challenges in between trips to the pool and park and other things. After my son was born, I added on regular trips of my own again, checking out stacks of books, both for him and for me.

And then, a friend who worked at the library suggested I think about it for myself, either as a volunteer or to work there. I did volunteer, making story time kits, sorting summer reading prizes, and wearing a mascot costume. I eventually began working as a substitute, later a library assistant.

Libraries look much different from this side of the desk. To some of our patrons, it’s still a place to go for quiet or to find books, magazines, DVDs or CDs. To others, it’s a place to find information – family obituaries, high school yearbooks, the phone number to that company you want to contact. We still have story times for little ones and author programs for adults, and many other things for everyone in-between.

It’s a strange place to be some days, however. You get the person who’s angry we don’t have free paper copies of the tax forms they need – even the IRS office here doesn’t do that. You see the people who say they haven’t been in a library for twenty years and seem surprised we even exist anymore – often they don’t have any idea you can download magazines, audiobooks and ebooks and do all kinds of research through the website. There are the retired folks who are still reading – we still have westerns and inspirational books in addition to the latest steamy romances, literary fiction, and mysteries. Teens come in after school to hang out or use the computers or find the latest in the series they’re into now. There are little ones playing with the puppets or at the train table, stay-at-home moms and dads looking for a tv series on DVD, the newcomer to the U.S. who’s trying to learn English or get citizenship or study for the ACT.

Because it’s a place for everyone, you get everyone. We see people from the shelter up the street, the kids in treatment, the guy who doesn’t use computers but needs to apply for a job online, the mentally ill who are on their own, the disabled who come in with helpers, the lonely people who are looking for a social connection. We also see businesspeople, workers, truck drivers, artists, writers, parents, and people studying for firefighter and nursing tests or the Armed Forces entrance exam. Many wonderful people come in our doors and thank us for finding that book with the red cover they read when they were a kid which they’d like to share with their grandchild. Others download pay stubs with our help or find a friend from long ago. It’s mostly good most of the time.

But inevitably, there are also the people who get mad about fines from ten years ago, because they never would have checked out that book, even though the birthdate, address and ID number match. There are the people who smell so strongly of alcohol, urine, cats or whatever that you can track them from forty feet away. There is the one who smears feces on the wall of the public bathroom. And the teens who swear and yell and then are surprised when we ask them to leave, because they’ve somehow always understood they can do absolutely whatever they want, anytime, anywhere, and it’s a public place, right?

We see people who say obnoxious things to us, or tell us it must be nice to have such an easy job where no one expects you to do anything, or think we’re part of the conspiracy against them. Once in a while, they might leave a trail of poop on the floor and still head straight over to the computers and log onto the internet, as if nothing untoward has happened. Or they might return a book which their dog has chewed up, their coffee has spilled on, they’ve dropped in the tub, or maybe their kid marked up with a Sharpie without mentioning anything about it, later denying they had anything to do with it. (We once had a person claim that the water damage to a book must have been done by the person before them and the book was still wet when we got it back.) There is that guy who takes all of his cellphone calls and talks so loudly that everyone in the library can hear him, instead of using the lobby like we ask. There are the parents who don’t supervise their kids and then get mad at us when we explain to their kids (and them) that it is not a safe place to play chase or hang off the stairwell or throw trains at each other. Like everywhere else, there is a lot of bad behavior going on. People just don’t usually think it happens at a library.

Still, I try to come back to the people who come to my writing group and share their poems or novels or life stories about their trained chickens.  (The chickens did not actually wear sweaters as far as I know, but the picture above somehow fit.) There are great teen volunteers who help out during summer reading, and others in the community who do their part in other ways. I regularly have patrons who come in to tell me about a book they’ve read which they think I would love – or a movie, or a CD or a graphic novel. Sometimes they’re only 6, but already have strong opinions about their books already. Sometimes they’re in their 90s and are just happy to have found another great read.

It’s hard to remember the kindness and laughter when someone is almost yelling at you or accusing you of being a CIA operative, but at the library, it’s all just part of the whole.

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HAT + BANANA = TUNA FISH … or not

 

lemoncello-olympics-200Book nerds love making connections. Really, who doesn’t enjoy bringing together different things they love into something joyful? Maybe you like fly fishing and great literature – can you find a poem that fits your mood perfectly when you’re out on the stream on a fine day and the fish are hungry? Yes! Maybe you favor gardening and baking – can your squash become a chocolate dessert? It can!

It doesn’t always work, though, which is why sequels to books like Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library make me a bit nervous. Escape was quirky and goofy, an homage to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, complete with wacky Mr. Lemoncello who sought out book and puzzle lovers to bring some joy to a new library. There were puzzles, lots of them, and mentions of favorite books, and kind words about librarians.

So, although my son grabbed Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics as soon as he saw it and didn’t give it up until he was done, I wasn’t initially convinced. Then, 48 pages in, I came across my favorite Neil Gaiman quote ever in a rebus, and really, that’s all it takes for me. I don’t know if that’s an exceptionally low standard or a high one, but throw in my favorite Neil Gaiman quote and a puzzle, and you’ve got me at page 48. Sure, the story is action-packed. Yes, there are mysteries and bad guys, snobs and ethical choices, mistakes and community-building. All of that is fun. But the love of books and libraries, the puzzles, and the true friends? All liowabrarians dig that stuff.

rebus lemon

Can you figure out my rebus? Part of it comes from the book – all credit to CG for working a brain into “librarian”. The solution? THIS BOOK IS FUN FOR LIBRARIANS.   Perhaps not as creative as working in Neil Gaiman, but true, so true.

Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics by Chris Grabenstein

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Fangirl at 102

play pauseI have a special fondness for V. She’s one of my homebound patrons, and she’s had a library card since she was seven and could walk the block to the library on her own. That was in 1920, by the way.

Visiting V is always filled with little surprises. One day we talked about her grandfather, who served on the Union side in the Civil War. Other times, she’s talked about her many years working for the local school district. She’s got funny stories about most of the men for whom the local schools are named. The other day, I found out that a relative of hers was involved in the Norwegian resistance during World War II. You never quite know where you’ll end up.

V is a lifelong reader and book lover. In the last few years, her eyesight has made it hard to read, so she “reads” through books on CD. She’s a Jan Karon fan, so she’s heard all the books in the Mitford series, and she frequently rereads those which are brought to life by John McDonough. I searched out other books he’s read which we’ve got in the library collection, and from Snow Treasure to presidential biographies, she’s loved them all. “I know I’m a traitor to my sex,” she’ll say, “but I just prefer the male voice, especially his. He’s really the best.”

One of her nephews knows she’s partial to John McDonough, so when the new Jan Karon book was coming out in September, he made sure to send it to her as soon as it was released. When I stopped in to drop off some new books this week, V explained that she was way behind on her reading. That new John McDonough is so good that she’s had to listen to it a few more times. Work, work, work.

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5 ways working in a public library is not so different from working in social services…

community-150124_1280Before I began working in a public library, I spent a lot of years working in social services with youth and families. Sure, the work can be very different. I haven’t ever walked into a patron’s home to talk about their child to find them passed out on the couch with music and the TV blaring. That happened more than once when I was in social services, but not ever at the library, thank goodness. (One of my homebound patrons is sometimes dozing in her chair when I arrive to drop off books, but that’s it.) Still, there are a few things you can transfer from one to the other – whichever direction you might be going.

  • Are you a problem solver? Both professions help people navigate through the gigantic mass of information out there to find what’s useful to them. Library workers help patrons who are looking for housing, food, jobs, educational resources, tax help – the same kinds of things of things I did when I was in outreach. Even if library staff don’t know everything about the community resources, they’re good at finding it with only a little information. And they share literature, music, and more, too.
  • Do you need people to be able to clearly explain what they want? A lot of people don’t really know what they need, whether they’re talking to their child’s case worker or to the person at the library’s information desk, so both professions ask a lot of questions. Sometimes an inquiry about “that book with the blue cover and the squiggly thing” will lead a librarian to a whole list of new books or resources. Social services workers often do the same kind of thing, connecting people with organizations, resources and assistance.
  • Do you have any experience with very challenging personalities? Social services workers aren’t the only ones who spend their days around people with a limited grasp on reality. Libraries are safe and warm in the winter, and safe and cool in the summer, so people who are homeless, between friends’ couches, or living in their cars can get a break from the elements, check their email, and search for jobs. Sometimes people who are grieving or depressed or struggling with the world in general come into a library, because they believe it’s a place someone will listen to them. They don’t always choose the best ways to interact, unfortunately. They might blow up at a staff member who tells them they have $2 in fines or accuse someone of turning on the CIA monitoring system when something goes wrong on the computer. (Been there, done that.) Most people in social services get training to deal with people who are mentally ill. That’s not always true for library workers.
  • Do you want to make  a lot of money while you change the world? Don’t choose these professions. Neither is rewarded financially for the good work they do in the community.  Sometimes people make a living wage, but it’s not often a salary that anyone would call “generous.” It says something about our values, I think, that these professions usually get paid so poorly, but the people doing them are expected to be educated and always able to find a way to make do with what little they get.
  • Can you look at the long-term? I wouldn’t have expected it when I started working at the library, but I’ve found that most people who walk in the door at the library really will come back again and again, and they remember whether or not they felt valued and treated well by the staff. If you can build a positive relationship with them from the beginning – even if they are upset about something or you can’t find the book or CD they want – they will seek you out again. It’s not so different in social services. Sometimes getting the information or action you need from a client involves a long-term plan, not because you want it to take a long time, but because they need a long time to feel ready to do whatever it is. If there’s trust, they can take the steps they need to take just a little quicker.

Having made the transition from social services to library work, I’m grateful almost daily for some past experience that helps me figure out what someone is looking for or not react to their assumptions about whatever they are ranting on about. The jobs might not be financially rewarding, but for someone who likes working with people, solving problems, and doing something different every day, they can both be challenging and emotionally rewarding – at least over that long-term time frame I mentioned above.

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5 things to love about leading library storytimes – for people who aren’t in youth services

picture booksWe have one youth services librarian at my branch — a wonderful, energetic, creative woman who does toddler, preschool, and family storytimes every week, as well as teen activities, tween book clubs and a bunch of other things, too. She’s really just amazing, but she can’t be there absolutely every time, so occasionally I fill in for her at storytime. It doesn’t happen that often, but it’s just the right frequency to remind me how stunningly good she is at her job and how much I like seeing kids light up about stories. It’s not something I’d love as much if I had to do it all the time, I don’t think, but it’s almost always fun in the moment.   So in honor of my most recent, slightly disorganized family storytime, here are 5 things I love about it all:

  1. Chaos! At family storytime, you never know what you’re going to get. Sometimes, like the other day, there are infants, toddlers, preschoolers, elementary kids, and adults of all ages, too. I don’t mind the babies who get a little fussy except when the music’s on or the toddlers who spend most of the storytime wandering around the room. Even the older kids might spend a few minutes staring at the walls instead of following what I’m doing. I remind myself that there are all kinds of learning going on there, and learning how to be in storytime and participate is one of them. Not everyone arrives with the same skill set, but everyone can still find something to enjoy.
  2. Music! Will I ever get tired of Laurie Berkner? I don’t think so. I am amused by These are my glasses every single time I use it with kids. There is so much great kid music out there – Dan Zanes, Justin Roberts, Elizabeth Mitchell, and pretty much anything from the Putumayo Kids collection. I’m a fan of traditional songs, too. Although not all parents and grandparents remember them, enough do that it works out. Singing and music are great for your brain, whatever age you are.
  3. Classic stories and nursery rhymes! I don’t do it every time, but I like to include classic stories or nursery rhymes, especially when there are actions that go with them. If you’re comfortable with storytelling without the book in front of you, kids also love stories without the pictures if you have puppets – even stick ones are fine – or flannelboard figures or even simple figures drawn on a whiteboard. While they might not realize it, kids start picking up the verbal cues for transitions and building excitement in stories, and they also develop their listening skills.
  4. Drawing! Cutting! I love doing draw-and-tell stories like the ones you can find in Richard Thompson’s books and at https://mdfbooks.wordpress.com/richard-thompson-draw-tell-stories/. There are also some fun cut-and-tell stories out there. Once you’ve done a few of them, you might even start creating your own!
  5. Parents and Grandparents! Sure, the kids are great – funny, silly, shy and all. But I also love seeing the parents and grandparents who come to storytime. After all, the little ones can’t get there without them. And it could be a great way to talk about our adult programs or some of our online options with them while they’re trapped in the meeting room. (I don’t usually remember to actually do it, but it’s a thought!) Sometimes we can connect for a few minutes over a story or the weather or some odd thing their kid is doing right now. Sometimes they are more focused on their phone or checking their email.   It’s nice if they are interactive, too, and some are, but I try to remember that they also might need a mental break from that little one for a few minutes, and having some goofy lady tell stories, sing songs, and dance completely out of rhythm might give them that. So it’s all good.
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5 myths about working at a library

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  1. It’s quiet at the library, or it’s supposed to be quiet ALL THE TIME, and women in cardigans (that would be me) go around saying, “SHHHHHHH…” to anyone who’s out of line. I may rock a cardie, but I don’t “SHHHHH.” If there are kids running around in circles and screaming, or teens using profanity so that everyone (meaning me) has to hear it, yes, I will talk to them and/or their parents. But, much to the annoyance of some folks, the public library is full of the public, including two-year-olds who squeal with excitement over Thomas the Tank Engine and people who see it more as a community center than a quiet study area. And that’s just fine.
  2. You get to read at work. I love it when people tell me that it must be great to have a job where you get to read at work.  Well, sure, it would be, but that’s not my job.  I do read. I read a lot. But not at work, although I’ll admit that when I’m in the stacks and come across something really funny or horrifying, I’ll sometimes take a minute or two to flip through a book. Usually that’s because I’m wondering what it’s still doing on our shelves. One example: I found a book about chinchilla care from the 1960s. When you let the book fall open on its own, it goes to illustrations of how to skin your chinchilla in preparation for the fur cape pattern further back in the book. (There’s a fur-lined swimsuit for warmer weather, too.) Eek. Definitely not what I was expecting.
  3. Everyone who works at a library loves to read. Some people do. Some people like other parts of the work like research, or working with patrons, or leading programs.
  4. Everything is free at the library, and if it isn’t free, it should be for me. Occasionally the “my taxes are paying for this” statement is attached to that idea. Sorry. My taxes pay for it, too, but not everything is free, although it would be lovely if it were. We’ve had budget cuts in the past that were not fully restored, so you have to pay for copies. You have to pay fines if things are late. You might have to pay a fee for a DVD rental. Oh, and by the way, if you check a book or DVD or CD out, never bring it back, and then refuse to pay for it, you might not get to check out more materials. People are sometimes surprised by this. (A side note – I ran my library use habits through an online calculator, and to pay for my usual level of reading, listening, and watching, I’d be shelling out something like $1,684.50 each month. I think paying for copies and occasionally having to replace a book is just dandy in comparison.)
  5. You could cut the staff and use volunteers, because everything’s on the internet, anyway. No one would expect volunteers to run schools or the police department, because you need to have a regular, committed staff with special training at those places. It turns out you need that at the library, too. And “everything” might be on the internet, but is it always reliable? Can you really always find what you’re looking for? I can’t. That’s why I like working with librarians. They can find it, and it’s not often from a site that also has cat videos, even if the cat videos are funny. Sometimes.

Image credit: BYU Library/Creative Commons

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capes + library = fun

logo 1Before the Star Wars and Frida Kahlo capes, it started with 7th grade Family and Consumer Science. They still sew in FACS – what we called “Home Ec” back in the day – and we needed to find material for a string bag for my son. We were at a fabric store, and we’d been talking about the new things in the children’s area at the library. Our youth librarian and manager had added dress-up clothes, a train table and new puppets, and the little ones were loving it all.

My son and I were looking at all the amazing patterns at the store when I started to wonder about capes. What if we made some capes to put in the dress-up tiger capearea? Capes are perfect for the library. If someone spills their mom’s coffee on a cape or steps on it with their muddy boots, you can just wash it, and they’re really, really hard to break. How hard could it be to find a simple pattern and throw something together? Maybe I could use up some of the fabric I’d stored in that big bin in the attic for years. Maybe we could re-use a few old library t-shirts. Maybe someone else had some fabric to pass on that would work.

I know. It sounds a little like an old movie… “Come on, kids, let’s put on a show!” But with the capes, I just knew this crazy scheme would somehow work out. So we charged forward. I asked the library staff for old t-shirts to recycle, and before long, orange, green, brown, black and blue shirts started showing butterfly capeup in the daily delivery.   I mentioned it to my sister, who happened to have a lot of Dr. Seuss fabric in her basement. A pattern was easy to find online, we came across some fun fabric on sale, and soon, my son and I had a nice stack for the library: a tiger, a princess, a superhero, a butterfly, and Rosie the bookmonster.

Kids can manage a cape if it’s got a Velcro fastener, and their imaginations are always ready to make the jump from wearing a superhero cape to being a superhero. Capes work for all kinds of characters — princesses, space aliens, farmers with flair, animals, chefs. With the right cape, you can be anything!   Seeing a little guy play with the new trains in one of our capes really made my day.

A few weeks passed. I couldn’t stop thinking about other possible capes, imagining what could be. Didn’t someone else need a cape? Most people would think that, laugh a little, and then go on with their day, shelving the idea with other impractical things. Not me. After talking to a few of the aides about my crazy idea, I made another cape for a student worker who was headed off to grad school. I remember grad school, and I’m telling you, there are moments when having a cape might just be the difference between an awful day and an ok one there. Another one down.

Then I realized I didn’t have to stop there. I could set up a survey, have my co-workers answer ridiculous questions, and make more capes. Do you sense a certain madness here? Well, I’m just getting started, my friends. It turns out that no one even tried to stop me from doing this. Not my family — apparently they’ve come to expect this kind of thing from me. Not even my boss. She didn’t wonder if this was an appropriate thing to bring into the library setting. She loved the idea and wanted one herself!

So I set up a survey and sent it out to my co-workers. I love surveys. Here are a few questions from it:

Which colors best fit your caped personality?

–bright, happy (orange, red, yellow)

–dark & brooding (brown, black, darker colors)

–pink, lots of pink!

–lively greens, blues, purples

–whatever

–other

Possible fabric options.  Choose at least a few.  I’m not sure what will work out.

–Batik – African – cool cultural – travel

–Alphabet – handprints – cute kids

–Dogs – cats – sharks – fish – owls – birds

–Music

–Flowers – plants

–Clifford the BIg Red Dog

–Curious George

–Disney Princesses – Frozen

–Hello Kitty

–Toy Story – Cars – Peanuts

–Spider-man – Superman – superheroes – Avengers

–Dr. Seuss – Eric Carle

–Star Trek – Star Wars – outer space – planets

–Books

–Something elegant

–Something nerdy

–Something else not on this list –  please explain below

List any favorites (e.g.: Star Wars but NOT Star Trek or NO CATS, only sharks!) or explain something else to help design your dream cape.  If you have ever wanted a “Hello Kitty” cape with pink polka dots on the back — I’m not naming names here — NOW is the time to mention it!

arthur cape

When all was said and done, everyone got a cape if they wanted one, and so did some of their kids. More than thirty capes in all, including an Arthur, a Frida Kahlo, a Star Wars, several Dr. Seusses, and a Star Trek.

Capes are a silly thing, really. But we all need things like the cape project sometimes. It’s not really about the capes, although they are pretty cool. It’s about the chance to have some pure fun and pure joy at a time when you really need it. How many other things in life can I say that about?

Did it hurt anyone? No. Did the kids (and the co-workers) like it? Yes. Did I see my fellow library workers (manager included) floating around the library on Halloween trailing pink Hello Kittys, books, and stars ? Oh, yes… That’s all I need to make it worth my time.

And we’ll be able to use them again soon when the summer reading theme is superheroes. They’ll probably even count as “business casual” then.

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Superheroes, villains and special powers

alicia avatar (2)I spend a lot of time thinking about superheroes. I live with a Spider-Man fan, and of course, there’s not just one Spider-Man. I can never keep all the versions straight, but it turns out that doesn’t matter that much, since I have an expert on hand to re-explain them at any time, in any place. We regularly talk about whether Wonder Woman could take out certain villains. We discuss what the lamest superpower would be – right now, we mostly agree that “moistness” as a superpower would be pretty useless if you couldn’t freeze, heat up, or explode at the same time, and then it might just be more annoying than scary or awe-inspiring.

Soon, the library will also be full of talk of supers for summer reading, so I’m getting ready for that, too. I’ve made superhero avatars and minions. (See www.cpbherofactory.com and www.vordak.com/minion-maker.html to make your own.) I’ve got my cape reaminiondy.  Really. I own a cape. But that’s a story for another day.

So, I have been thinking about superhero fiction. Thanks to my resident expert and an eclectic bookshelf, here are a few to consider for your summer reading. I’ve put those that seem to work better for younger readers at the top and those for older kids and teens later on.

Flora and Ulysses – Kate DiCamillo… An ordinary squirrel gains special powers after an encounter with a vacuum. Amazing!

Almost Super and Searching for Super – Marion Jensen… Two brothers from a superhero family realize their powers are duds. Sound familiar?

Sidekicked and Minion – John David Anderson… What if your family expected you to become a sidekick or a minion?

The Girl Who Could Fly – Victoria Forester… People close to home thinks she’s weird, but then Piper is sent to a special school for kids with exceptional abilities, which turns out to be even more exceptional than expected.

Savvy and Scumble – Ingrid Law… On turning 13, you receive your special power, your “savvy,” and then things go a little nuts.

Vordak the Incomprehensible series – Scott Seegert… “Greetings, inferior one!” is just the beginning of the fun. You will laugh and laugh some more. (The author also has a fun website – mentioned above – at www.vordak.com )

Sidekicks – Dan Santat Captain Amazing needs some help. His pets try to step up in this graphic novel.

El Deafo – Cece Bell… A graphic memoir about the author’s journey through hearing loss to becoming her own superhero.

Powerless, Super, and Villainous – Matthew Cody… In a town of supers, what do you do if you’re a “regular” kid?

Joshua Dread series – Lee Bacon… Superhero summer camp for a kid whose parents are supervillains?

Evil Genius series – Catherine Jinks… A child prodigy and hacker finds out his true identity after going to an advanced crime academy.

V is for Villain – Peter Moore… What will happen when you find out the truth about superheroes?

Archvillain, Mad Mask and Yesterday Again – Barry Lyga… Kyle knows Mighty Mike’s secret. Is it one he can keep?

The Zodiac Legacy series– Stan Lee, Andie Tong, Stuart Moore… 12 teens take on superpowers found in the Chinese zodiac. Convergence is the 1st book in the series.

Quantum Prophecy and Super Human series – Michael Carroll… All of the supers vanished ten years ago. What will happen when teens begin to show superpowers now?

 

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